Multiclassing – Baldur’s Gate 3

Baldur’s Gate 3 is based on the 5th Edition Dungeons & Dragons ruleset, and as such, it allows you to Multiclass your characters in order to create some fun, strong, or simply weird Class combinations. This guide will walk you through the basics of this arcane process.

Multiclassing in Baldur’s Gate 3 is as simple as reaching Level 2, navigating to the top right of your level up summary screen, and clicking the Add Class button. You can see that sneaky button on the screenshot below.

bg3addclassbutton

From there, you’ll be able to chose a new Class and finalize the process. An important thing to remember here is to customize your new Class, as simply pressing Accept will leave you stuck with default choices. You can customize the new Class by navigating the menu on the very left side of your screen, as shown on the next screenshot.

bg3customizeclass

Multiclassing in Baldur’s Gate 3 comes with its own set of rules and limitations. If you’re familiar with the pen and paper version of Dungeons & Dragons, or maybe an earlier edition of the ruleset, you should know that you don’t need to worry about hitting any Ability Score minimums to multiclass here, and there is no experience penalty of any sort. The experience point cost to gain a new level is still based on your combined character level, though.

Another thing to keep in mind is that Class progression is separate. Meaning that if a Class gains a Feat on Level 4 or an extra attack on Level 5, you will have to hit those levels on that particular Class (Extra Attacks from different Classes don’t stack). Just about the only thing that goes up based on your combined Class level is your Proficiency Bonus.

And while Multiclassing grants you access to a full set of new Class features, it won’t give you the starting equipment for the new Class and will come with limited new Proficiencies. Below, you’ll find a table listing the new Proficiencies you’ll gain when Multiclassing.

Class
Proficiencies
Barbarian
Simple Weapons, Martial Weapons, Shields
Bard
Light Armour, 1 Skill with Profficiency
Cleric
Morningstars, Light Armour, Medium Armour, Shields
Druid
Light Armour, Medium Armour, Shields
Fighter
Simple Weapons, Martial Weapons, Light Armour, Medium Armour, Shields
Monk
Simple Weapons, Shortswords
Paladin
Simple Weapons, Martial Weapons, Light Armour, Medium Armour, Shields
Ranger
Simple Weapons, Light Armour, Medium Armour, Shields, 1 Skill with Profficiency
Rogue
Light Armour, 1 Skill with Profficiency, 2 Skills with Expertise
Sorcerer
Warlock
Simple Weapons, Light Armour
Wizard

When gaining levels in two or more spellcasting Classes, each Class will preserve its own spell progression and spell book, however the total number of Spell Slots you’ll have will be determined by your combined spellcaster level. You can calculate it, as per the Systems Reference Document, by combining all your levels in the Bard, Cleric, Druid, Sorcerer, and Wizard classes, and half your levels (rounded down) in the Paladin and Ranger Classes. Then, you can use the below table to figure out how many spells your multiclassed spellcasters will have available to them.

Level
1st Level Spells
2nd Level Spells
3rd Level Spells
4th Level Spells
5th Level Spells
6th Level Spells
1
2
2
3
3
4
2
4
4
3
5
4
3
2
6
4
3
3
7
4
3
3
1
8
4
3
3
2
9
4
3
3
3
1
10
4
3
3
3
2
11
4
3
3
3
2
1
12
4
3
3
3
2
1
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Val Hull
Val Hull

Resident role-playing RPG game expert. Knows where trolls and paladins come from. You must fight for your right to gather your party before venturing forth.

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