farming going medieval featured image
Game: Going Medieval
Content Type: Gaming Guides


Farming is relatively straightforward in Going Medieval: you designate an area for crops using the Zone menu [F7] zone button going medieval, they grow, and your settlers will automatically harvest them (assuming someone has been assigned to do so). That being said, you can easily end up having your settlers waste days of labor planting crops you’ll never need. In this guide, we’ll take a look at what crops to plant when, and also figure out exactly how much food you need to plant for your settlers.

going medieval farming mushrooms are just ok
Your settlers deserve better

Depending on your need, you’ll need to plant different things! In most cases, you’ll want to plant most or all of the different crops available.

Food
Description
Days to Full Yield
Harvest Quantity
Total Harvests (before replanting is required)
Cabbage
The humble cabbage is ready to harvest quicker than any other crop, and has as good a yield to time ratio as any. This should be your first crop to plant for food, though later it can be replaced by the other food crops if you have something against cabbage
5
6
1
Flax
Flax is the only way to get Linen if you don’t want to deconstruct other pieces of clothing. From the tooltip, it seems it will also be used in cooking eventually, but that feature is not currently implemented
8
11
1
Carrot
Carrots keep very well, and so are useful in your preparations for winter, which mostly involve storing food
7
9
1
Beet
Like cabbage, these currently are only good for food
9
10
1
Barley
Your settlers love to drink, and barley will allow you to create Ale and Beer
14
5
1
Herbs
Herbs are used in everything from cooking to medicine, and are always useful to have
8
6
1
Redcurrant
Redcurrant is a flexible crop that can be used to create wine or meals, and also yields sticks when harvested
15
7 (both berries and sticks)
5
Tall Grass
Currently only used for bedding and roofs, but should eventually be used for animal fodder as well
4
30
1
Birch Trees
Used for dye and medicine according to the tooltip, but currently only good for wood and sticks
54
55 (sticks and wood)
1

For these calculations we’ll assume every settler you have needs to eat one meal per day, which as far as we know is the standard rate of consumption on normal difficulty.

A meal requires 12 units of raw food; we’ll plant cabbage because is the quickest crop to reach maximum yield. Cabbage takes 5 days to yield 6 raw food. Therefore, each settler requires the yield of 2 cabbage patches a day (6×2=12) to eat a meal each day.

going medieval farming cabbage math
He doesn’t do the math, he just hoes the rows

Knowing this, we can plant 10 cabbage patches per settler and be guaranteed to have exactly enough raw food to craft a meal, per day, per person. 10 patches means at the end of the 5 days, you’ll have 60 raw food; 60 raw food divided by 12 raw food per meal = 5 meals per settler, every 5 days. Of course, you can plant any food you like, so long as your total raw food output is 12 raw food a day, per settler.

That about covers all the basics of farming in Going Medieval! We hope this guide was helpful, and let us know in the comments if you have any questions or suggestions.

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